eyesofresolute128:

guildhall:

Sweet Lad, Tender Lad
A Pictorial History of Afro-American Gay Couples

Sweet lad, tender lad, Have no shame, you’re mine for good; We share a sole insurgent fire, We live in boundless brotherhood.
I do not fear the gibes of men; One being split in two we dwell, The kernel of a double nut Embedded in a single shell. 

(From ‘Imitation of the Arabic’ by Afro-Russian poet, Aleksandr Sergeyevich Pushkin)
Playwright & historian, Trent Kelley, has curated these photographs from his personal collection documenting love and affection among African American gay male couples.  The essay is entitled ‘Hidden in the Open:  A Photographic Essay of Afro-American Male Couples.”
Kelley has written in the Huffington Post:

Afro American same-sex loving gay men who were coupled with one another in the distant past walked the streets, ate at the dinner tables, and generally participated in their larger ethnic community out in the open, their relationships known only to those who were consequential to their everyday lives. In this respect, they were out in the open but hidden to those who didn’t know about their sexual proclivities. Hence, the title of this series of pictures dating from the mid 19th century to the late 20th century is “Hidden in the Open: A Photographic Essay of Afro-American Male Couples.”
Some of these images are sure to depict gay couples, whereas others may not. 
The end result is speculative at best, for want in applying a label. Not every gesture articulated between these men is an indication of male-to-male intimacies. Assuredly, what all the photographs have in common are signs of Afro-American male affection and love that were recorded for posterity without fear and shame. Friendships where men often wrote romantically to one another, walked arm in arm were not uncommon to straight and gay men alike during the 19th and early 20th centuries. Depending on economic situation, many even slept together and this may have precluded or included physical intimacy between the sheets.
But there were past generations of Afro American gay men who lived and love bravely. They exist in these photographs. Like today’s gay male of African descent, the majority of them were never victims who whined nor required rescuing. Their presence here defy a lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community often wanting to make them an impotent footnote absent of any self-empowerment within gay culture and those vocally homophobic pockets within a black community wanting to write these men out of the narrative to Afro-American history.

See the rest of this outstanding collection here
eyesofresolute128:

guildhall:

Sweet Lad, Tender Lad
A Pictorial History of Afro-American Gay Couples

Sweet lad, tender lad, Have no shame, you’re mine for good; We share a sole insurgent fire, We live in boundless brotherhood.
I do not fear the gibes of men; One being split in two we dwell, The kernel of a double nut Embedded in a single shell. 

(From ‘Imitation of the Arabic’ by Afro-Russian poet, Aleksandr Sergeyevich Pushkin)
Playwright & historian, Trent Kelley, has curated these photographs from his personal collection documenting love and affection among African American gay male couples.  The essay is entitled ‘Hidden in the Open:  A Photographic Essay of Afro-American Male Couples.”
Kelley has written in the Huffington Post:

Afro American same-sex loving gay men who were coupled with one another in the distant past walked the streets, ate at the dinner tables, and generally participated in their larger ethnic community out in the open, their relationships known only to those who were consequential to their everyday lives. In this respect, they were out in the open but hidden to those who didn’t know about their sexual proclivities. Hence, the title of this series of pictures dating from the mid 19th century to the late 20th century is “Hidden in the Open: A Photographic Essay of Afro-American Male Couples.”
Some of these images are sure to depict gay couples, whereas others may not. 
The end result is speculative at best, for want in applying a label. Not every gesture articulated between these men is an indication of male-to-male intimacies. Assuredly, what all the photographs have in common are signs of Afro-American male affection and love that were recorded for posterity without fear and shame. Friendships where men often wrote romantically to one another, walked arm in arm were not uncommon to straight and gay men alike during the 19th and early 20th centuries. Depending on economic situation, many even slept together and this may have precluded or included physical intimacy between the sheets.
But there were past generations of Afro American gay men who lived and love bravely. They exist in these photographs. Like today’s gay male of African descent, the majority of them were never victims who whined nor required rescuing. Their presence here defy a lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community often wanting to make them an impotent footnote absent of any self-empowerment within gay culture and those vocally homophobic pockets within a black community wanting to write these men out of the narrative to Afro-American history.

See the rest of this outstanding collection here
eyesofresolute128:

guildhall:

Sweet Lad, Tender Lad
A Pictorial History of Afro-American Gay Couples

Sweet lad, tender lad, Have no shame, you’re mine for good; We share a sole insurgent fire, We live in boundless brotherhood.
I do not fear the gibes of men; One being split in two we dwell, The kernel of a double nut Embedded in a single shell. 

(From ‘Imitation of the Arabic’ by Afro-Russian poet, Aleksandr Sergeyevich Pushkin)
Playwright & historian, Trent Kelley, has curated these photographs from his personal collection documenting love and affection among African American gay male couples.  The essay is entitled ‘Hidden in the Open:  A Photographic Essay of Afro-American Male Couples.”
Kelley has written in the Huffington Post:

Afro American same-sex loving gay men who were coupled with one another in the distant past walked the streets, ate at the dinner tables, and generally participated in their larger ethnic community out in the open, their relationships known only to those who were consequential to their everyday lives. In this respect, they were out in the open but hidden to those who didn’t know about their sexual proclivities. Hence, the title of this series of pictures dating from the mid 19th century to the late 20th century is “Hidden in the Open: A Photographic Essay of Afro-American Male Couples.”
Some of these images are sure to depict gay couples, whereas others may not. 
The end result is speculative at best, for want in applying a label. Not every gesture articulated between these men is an indication of male-to-male intimacies. Assuredly, what all the photographs have in common are signs of Afro-American male affection and love that were recorded for posterity without fear and shame. Friendships where men often wrote romantically to one another, walked arm in arm were not uncommon to straight and gay men alike during the 19th and early 20th centuries. Depending on economic situation, many even slept together and this may have precluded or included physical intimacy between the sheets.
But there were past generations of Afro American gay men who lived and love bravely. They exist in these photographs. Like today’s gay male of African descent, the majority of them were never victims who whined nor required rescuing. Their presence here defy a lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community often wanting to make them an impotent footnote absent of any self-empowerment within gay culture and those vocally homophobic pockets within a black community wanting to write these men out of the narrative to Afro-American history.

See the rest of this outstanding collection here
eyesofresolute128:

guildhall:

Sweet Lad, Tender Lad
A Pictorial History of Afro-American Gay Couples

Sweet lad, tender lad, Have no shame, you’re mine for good; We share a sole insurgent fire, We live in boundless brotherhood.
I do not fear the gibes of men; One being split in two we dwell, The kernel of a double nut Embedded in a single shell. 

(From ‘Imitation of the Arabic’ by Afro-Russian poet, Aleksandr Sergeyevich Pushkin)
Playwright & historian, Trent Kelley, has curated these photographs from his personal collection documenting love and affection among African American gay male couples.  The essay is entitled ‘Hidden in the Open:  A Photographic Essay of Afro-American Male Couples.”
Kelley has written in the Huffington Post:

Afro American same-sex loving gay men who were coupled with one another in the distant past walked the streets, ate at the dinner tables, and generally participated in their larger ethnic community out in the open, their relationships known only to those who were consequential to their everyday lives. In this respect, they were out in the open but hidden to those who didn’t know about their sexual proclivities. Hence, the title of this series of pictures dating from the mid 19th century to the late 20th century is “Hidden in the Open: A Photographic Essay of Afro-American Male Couples.”
Some of these images are sure to depict gay couples, whereas others may not. 
The end result is speculative at best, for want in applying a label. Not every gesture articulated between these men is an indication of male-to-male intimacies. Assuredly, what all the photographs have in common are signs of Afro-American male affection and love that were recorded for posterity without fear and shame. Friendships where men often wrote romantically to one another, walked arm in arm were not uncommon to straight and gay men alike during the 19th and early 20th centuries. Depending on economic situation, many even slept together and this may have precluded or included physical intimacy between the sheets.
But there were past generations of Afro American gay men who lived and love bravely. They exist in these photographs. Like today’s gay male of African descent, the majority of them were never victims who whined nor required rescuing. Their presence here defy a lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community often wanting to make them an impotent footnote absent of any self-empowerment within gay culture and those vocally homophobic pockets within a black community wanting to write these men out of the narrative to Afro-American history.

See the rest of this outstanding collection here
eyesofresolute128:

guildhall:

Sweet Lad, Tender Lad
A Pictorial History of Afro-American Gay Couples

Sweet lad, tender lad, Have no shame, you’re mine for good; We share a sole insurgent fire, We live in boundless brotherhood.
I do not fear the gibes of men; One being split in two we dwell, The kernel of a double nut Embedded in a single shell. 

(From ‘Imitation of the Arabic’ by Afro-Russian poet, Aleksandr Sergeyevich Pushkin)
Playwright & historian, Trent Kelley, has curated these photographs from his personal collection documenting love and affection among African American gay male couples.  The essay is entitled ‘Hidden in the Open:  A Photographic Essay of Afro-American Male Couples.”
Kelley has written in the Huffington Post:

Afro American same-sex loving gay men who were coupled with one another in the distant past walked the streets, ate at the dinner tables, and generally participated in their larger ethnic community out in the open, their relationships known only to those who were consequential to their everyday lives. In this respect, they were out in the open but hidden to those who didn’t know about their sexual proclivities. Hence, the title of this series of pictures dating from the mid 19th century to the late 20th century is “Hidden in the Open: A Photographic Essay of Afro-American Male Couples.”
Some of these images are sure to depict gay couples, whereas others may not. 
The end result is speculative at best, for want in applying a label. Not every gesture articulated between these men is an indication of male-to-male intimacies. Assuredly, what all the photographs have in common are signs of Afro-American male affection and love that were recorded for posterity without fear and shame. Friendships where men often wrote romantically to one another, walked arm in arm were not uncommon to straight and gay men alike during the 19th and early 20th centuries. Depending on economic situation, many even slept together and this may have precluded or included physical intimacy between the sheets.
But there were past generations of Afro American gay men who lived and love bravely. They exist in these photographs. Like today’s gay male of African descent, the majority of them were never victims who whined nor required rescuing. Their presence here defy a lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community often wanting to make them an impotent footnote absent of any self-empowerment within gay culture and those vocally homophobic pockets within a black community wanting to write these men out of the narrative to Afro-American history.

See the rest of this outstanding collection here
eyesofresolute128:

guildhall:

Sweet Lad, Tender Lad
A Pictorial History of Afro-American Gay Couples

Sweet lad, tender lad, Have no shame, you’re mine for good; We share a sole insurgent fire, We live in boundless brotherhood.
I do not fear the gibes of men; One being split in two we dwell, The kernel of a double nut Embedded in a single shell. 

(From ‘Imitation of the Arabic’ by Afro-Russian poet, Aleksandr Sergeyevich Pushkin)
Playwright & historian, Trent Kelley, has curated these photographs from his personal collection documenting love and affection among African American gay male couples.  The essay is entitled ‘Hidden in the Open:  A Photographic Essay of Afro-American Male Couples.”
Kelley has written in the Huffington Post:

Afro American same-sex loving gay men who were coupled with one another in the distant past walked the streets, ate at the dinner tables, and generally participated in their larger ethnic community out in the open, their relationships known only to those who were consequential to their everyday lives. In this respect, they were out in the open but hidden to those who didn’t know about their sexual proclivities. Hence, the title of this series of pictures dating from the mid 19th century to the late 20th century is “Hidden in the Open: A Photographic Essay of Afro-American Male Couples.”
Some of these images are sure to depict gay couples, whereas others may not. 
The end result is speculative at best, for want in applying a label. Not every gesture articulated between these men is an indication of male-to-male intimacies. Assuredly, what all the photographs have in common are signs of Afro-American male affection and love that were recorded for posterity without fear and shame. Friendships where men often wrote romantically to one another, walked arm in arm were not uncommon to straight and gay men alike during the 19th and early 20th centuries. Depending on economic situation, many even slept together and this may have precluded or included physical intimacy between the sheets.
But there were past generations of Afro American gay men who lived and love bravely. They exist in these photographs. Like today’s gay male of African descent, the majority of them were never victims who whined nor required rescuing. Their presence here defy a lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community often wanting to make them an impotent footnote absent of any self-empowerment within gay culture and those vocally homophobic pockets within a black community wanting to write these men out of the narrative to Afro-American history.

See the rest of this outstanding collection here
eyesofresolute128:

guildhall:

Sweet Lad, Tender Lad
A Pictorial History of Afro-American Gay Couples

Sweet lad, tender lad, Have no shame, you’re mine for good; We share a sole insurgent fire, We live in boundless brotherhood.
I do not fear the gibes of men; One being split in two we dwell, The kernel of a double nut Embedded in a single shell. 

(From ‘Imitation of the Arabic’ by Afro-Russian poet, Aleksandr Sergeyevich Pushkin)
Playwright & historian, Trent Kelley, has curated these photographs from his personal collection documenting love and affection among African American gay male couples.  The essay is entitled ‘Hidden in the Open:  A Photographic Essay of Afro-American Male Couples.”
Kelley has written in the Huffington Post:

Afro American same-sex loving gay men who were coupled with one another in the distant past walked the streets, ate at the dinner tables, and generally participated in their larger ethnic community out in the open, their relationships known only to those who were consequential to their everyday lives. In this respect, they were out in the open but hidden to those who didn’t know about their sexual proclivities. Hence, the title of this series of pictures dating from the mid 19th century to the late 20th century is “Hidden in the Open: A Photographic Essay of Afro-American Male Couples.”
Some of these images are sure to depict gay couples, whereas others may not. 
The end result is speculative at best, for want in applying a label. Not every gesture articulated between these men is an indication of male-to-male intimacies. Assuredly, what all the photographs have in common are signs of Afro-American male affection and love that were recorded for posterity without fear and shame. Friendships where men often wrote romantically to one another, walked arm in arm were not uncommon to straight and gay men alike during the 19th and early 20th centuries. Depending on economic situation, many even slept together and this may have precluded or included physical intimacy between the sheets.
But there were past generations of Afro American gay men who lived and love bravely. They exist in these photographs. Like today’s gay male of African descent, the majority of them were never victims who whined nor required rescuing. Their presence here defy a lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community often wanting to make them an impotent footnote absent of any self-empowerment within gay culture and those vocally homophobic pockets within a black community wanting to write these men out of the narrative to Afro-American history.

See the rest of this outstanding collection here
eyesofresolute128:

guildhall:

Sweet Lad, Tender Lad
A Pictorial History of Afro-American Gay Couples

Sweet lad, tender lad, Have no shame, you’re mine for good; We share a sole insurgent fire, We live in boundless brotherhood.
I do not fear the gibes of men; One being split in two we dwell, The kernel of a double nut Embedded in a single shell. 

(From ‘Imitation of the Arabic’ by Afro-Russian poet, Aleksandr Sergeyevich Pushkin)
Playwright & historian, Trent Kelley, has curated these photographs from his personal collection documenting love and affection among African American gay male couples.  The essay is entitled ‘Hidden in the Open:  A Photographic Essay of Afro-American Male Couples.”
Kelley has written in the Huffington Post:

Afro American same-sex loving gay men who were coupled with one another in the distant past walked the streets, ate at the dinner tables, and generally participated in their larger ethnic community out in the open, their relationships known only to those who were consequential to their everyday lives. In this respect, they were out in the open but hidden to those who didn’t know about their sexual proclivities. Hence, the title of this series of pictures dating from the mid 19th century to the late 20th century is “Hidden in the Open: A Photographic Essay of Afro-American Male Couples.”
Some of these images are sure to depict gay couples, whereas others may not. 
The end result is speculative at best, for want in applying a label. Not every gesture articulated between these men is an indication of male-to-male intimacies. Assuredly, what all the photographs have in common are signs of Afro-American male affection and love that were recorded for posterity without fear and shame. Friendships where men often wrote romantically to one another, walked arm in arm were not uncommon to straight and gay men alike during the 19th and early 20th centuries. Depending on economic situation, many even slept together and this may have precluded or included physical intimacy between the sheets.
But there were past generations of Afro American gay men who lived and love bravely. They exist in these photographs. Like today’s gay male of African descent, the majority of them were never victims who whined nor required rescuing. Their presence here defy a lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community often wanting to make them an impotent footnote absent of any self-empowerment within gay culture and those vocally homophobic pockets within a black community wanting to write these men out of the narrative to Afro-American history.

See the rest of this outstanding collection here
eyesofresolute128:

guildhall:

Sweet Lad, Tender Lad
A Pictorial History of Afro-American Gay Couples

Sweet lad, tender lad, Have no shame, you’re mine for good; We share a sole insurgent fire, We live in boundless brotherhood.
I do not fear the gibes of men; One being split in two we dwell, The kernel of a double nut Embedded in a single shell. 

(From ‘Imitation of the Arabic’ by Afro-Russian poet, Aleksandr Sergeyevich Pushkin)
Playwright & historian, Trent Kelley, has curated these photographs from his personal collection documenting love and affection among African American gay male couples.  The essay is entitled ‘Hidden in the Open:  A Photographic Essay of Afro-American Male Couples.”
Kelley has written in the Huffington Post:

Afro American same-sex loving gay men who were coupled with one another in the distant past walked the streets, ate at the dinner tables, and generally participated in their larger ethnic community out in the open, their relationships known only to those who were consequential to their everyday lives. In this respect, they were out in the open but hidden to those who didn’t know about their sexual proclivities. Hence, the title of this series of pictures dating from the mid 19th century to the late 20th century is “Hidden in the Open: A Photographic Essay of Afro-American Male Couples.”
Some of these images are sure to depict gay couples, whereas others may not. 
The end result is speculative at best, for want in applying a label. Not every gesture articulated between these men is an indication of male-to-male intimacies. Assuredly, what all the photographs have in common are signs of Afro-American male affection and love that were recorded for posterity without fear and shame. Friendships where men often wrote romantically to one another, walked arm in arm were not uncommon to straight and gay men alike during the 19th and early 20th centuries. Depending on economic situation, many even slept together and this may have precluded or included physical intimacy between the sheets.
But there were past generations of Afro American gay men who lived and love bravely. They exist in these photographs. Like today’s gay male of African descent, the majority of them were never victims who whined nor required rescuing. Their presence here defy a lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community often wanting to make them an impotent footnote absent of any self-empowerment within gay culture and those vocally homophobic pockets within a black community wanting to write these men out of the narrative to Afro-American history.

See the rest of this outstanding collection here
eyesofresolute128:

guildhall:

Sweet Lad, Tender Lad
A Pictorial History of Afro-American Gay Couples

Sweet lad, tender lad, Have no shame, you’re mine for good; We share a sole insurgent fire, We live in boundless brotherhood.
I do not fear the gibes of men; One being split in two we dwell, The kernel of a double nut Embedded in a single shell. 

(From ‘Imitation of the Arabic’ by Afro-Russian poet, Aleksandr Sergeyevich Pushkin)
Playwright & historian, Trent Kelley, has curated these photographs from his personal collection documenting love and affection among African American gay male couples.  The essay is entitled ‘Hidden in the Open:  A Photographic Essay of Afro-American Male Couples.”
Kelley has written in the Huffington Post:

Afro American same-sex loving gay men who were coupled with one another in the distant past walked the streets, ate at the dinner tables, and generally participated in their larger ethnic community out in the open, their relationships known only to those who were consequential to their everyday lives. In this respect, they were out in the open but hidden to those who didn’t know about their sexual proclivities. Hence, the title of this series of pictures dating from the mid 19th century to the late 20th century is “Hidden in the Open: A Photographic Essay of Afro-American Male Couples.”
Some of these images are sure to depict gay couples, whereas others may not. 
The end result is speculative at best, for want in applying a label. Not every gesture articulated between these men is an indication of male-to-male intimacies. Assuredly, what all the photographs have in common are signs of Afro-American male affection and love that were recorded for posterity without fear and shame. Friendships where men often wrote romantically to one another, walked arm in arm were not uncommon to straight and gay men alike during the 19th and early 20th centuries. Depending on economic situation, many even slept together and this may have precluded or included physical intimacy between the sheets.
But there were past generations of Afro American gay men who lived and love bravely. They exist in these photographs. Like today’s gay male of African descent, the majority of them were never victims who whined nor required rescuing. Their presence here defy a lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community often wanting to make them an impotent footnote absent of any self-empowerment within gay culture and those vocally homophobic pockets within a black community wanting to write these men out of the narrative to Afro-American history.

See the rest of this outstanding collection here

eyesofresolute128:

guildhall:

Sweet Lad, Tender Lad

A Pictorial History of Afro-American Gay Couples

Sweet lad, tender lad,
Have no shame, you’re mine for good;
We share a sole insurgent fire,
We live in boundless brotherhood.

I do not fear the gibes of men;
One being split in two we dwell,
The kernel of a double nut
Embedded in a single shell.

(From ‘Imitation of the Arabic’ by Afro-Russian poet, Aleksandr Sergeyevich Pushkin)

Playwright & historian, Trent Kelley, has curated these photographs from his personal collection documenting love and affection among African American gay male couples.  The essay is entitled ‘Hidden in the Open:  A Photographic Essay of Afro-American Male Couples.”

Kelley has written in the Huffington Post:

Afro American same-sex loving gay men who were coupled with one another in the distant past walked the streets, ate at the dinner tables, and generally participated in their larger ethnic community out in the open, their relationships known only to those who were consequential to their everyday lives. In this respect, they were out in the open but hidden to those who didn’t know about their sexual proclivities. Hence, the title of this series of pictures dating from the mid 19th century to the late 20th century is “Hidden in the Open: A Photographic Essay of Afro-American Male Couples.”

Some of these images are sure to depict gay couples, whereas others may not.

The end result is speculative at best, for want in applying a label. Not every gesture articulated between these men is an indication of male-to-male intimacies. Assuredly, what all the photographs have in common are signs of Afro-American male affection and love that were recorded for posterity without fear and shame. Friendships where men often wrote romantically to one another, walked arm in arm were not uncommon to straight and gay men alike during the 19th and early 20th centuries. Depending on economic situation, many even slept together and this may have precluded or included physical intimacy between the sheets.

But there were past generations of Afro American gay men who lived and love bravely. They exist in these photographs. Like today’s gay male of African descent, the majority of them were never victims who whined nor required rescuing. Their presence here defy a lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community often wanting to make them an impotent footnote absent of any self-empowerment within gay culture and those vocally homophobic pockets within a black community wanting to write these men out of the narrative to Afro-American history.

See the rest of this outstanding collection here

desidere:

thesanityclause:

nooby-banana:

countsassmaster:

toughtink:

nooby-banana:

i KNOW i’m just beating a long-dead horse by doing this but for god’s sake disney

fyi only superficial things were changed in the edit (hair, eyelash length, freckles, skin tone) the actual model wasn’t changed at all

to be clear: she photoshopped anna’s hair onto hiro’s mom face. a lot of people in reblogs seem to think that the one on the right is literally anna and trying to find miniscule, non-existant differences… which sort of proves the point? that a picture of a different character can be mistaken for anna so easily with just a hairstyle change and that people will still defend the design choice to the death rather than admit the similarities… sheeesh.

How about this. You go to Pixar studio, and you tell them to change it. or get a job there and do it yourself, OH WAIT

YOU CAN’T! Cause you’re just someone bitching on the internet, and businesses don’t care about people bitching on the internet.

such a sad shame, isn’t it? Reality really.

Also, no, she STILL doesn’t look like Anna, even with Anna’s hair, she doesn’t look like anna, she just looks like that other chick with Anna’s hair.

the fact that you have no creative eye to tell a difference in characters, even by minuscule teeny details, is ridiculous.

they’re still two different charterers

and by sitting there and comparing them all day, of course they’re going to look similar to you.

Quit bitching will you PLEASE.

Stop looking for every little thing to complain about, because Disney? Disney don’t give a fuck, and no matter how hard you try, they will NEVER give a fuck.

Okay.

Okay I’m gonna pull this card because you’re just rude enough for it. I was an animation intern at Pixar in 2011 and just last year I was offered a job there that I only turned down because right now I prefer a permanent position as opposed to a 3-6 month contract. So no, you don’t get to use the “get a job and do it yourself” bullcrap on me.

Of course the edit doesn’t look exactly like Anna. But honestly, trying to tell me that the edit looks NOTHING like her is absurd. The proportions and facial features are very, very similar. If I were to overlay Anna’s face with Hiro’s mom there would be small differences, like maybe one nose is straighter than the other.  When discussing character design similarities like this are terrible. There are infinite possibilities and Disney keeps using the same general face recently.

And I don’t complain just because it’s Disney. If another studio did this I would be on their ass about it too. I love animation and I love seeing studios push beyond what’s been done before. On top of that, I don’t complain because I hate the company, I complain because I know they can do SO MUCH BETTER.

Sit the fuck down, son. You just got told by a real quality professional and all of the other professionals are just shaking their heads at you.

/slow claps it out 

andrysb24:

wheelchair-warrior:

bigmamag:

doctorwinchesterin221b:

locaoverloki:

prodigium-in-the-tardis:

amarilloo:

deeeeeeeeeeeeeeeaaaaaaaaaaaaaaan:

we-avenge-if-we-want-to:

triggafiasco:

loki-cat:

iamladyloki:

C R Y I N G OMG

I DONT THINK YOU GUYS UNDERSTAND
HOW MUCH I LOVE THESE SPIDERMAN PICS

OH OH OHHH! I have some!! 









oh shit not this fucking bullshit again oh my god jfklsdjflkj

THERE’S MORE WHERE THAT CAME FROM! 













HOLY FUCK HE’S BACK OMG
I’M ACUTALLY CRYING HERE OH GOD




can’t forget these

THESE ARE GOLDEN



Spiderman memes were one of my earliest experiences with the internet and with Tumblr and they will always be the greatest


I’ve seen these countless times and they still crack me up so much. I just hate when they appear on my dash at work. So hard not to laugh maniacally
andrysb24:

wheelchair-warrior:

bigmamag:

doctorwinchesterin221b:

locaoverloki:

prodigium-in-the-tardis:

amarilloo:

deeeeeeeeeeeeeeeaaaaaaaaaaaaaaan:

we-avenge-if-we-want-to:

triggafiasco:

loki-cat:

iamladyloki:

C R Y I N G OMG

I DONT THINK YOU GUYS UNDERSTAND
HOW MUCH I LOVE THESE SPIDERMAN PICS

OH OH OHHH! I have some!! 









oh shit not this fucking bullshit again oh my god jfklsdjflkj

THERE’S MORE WHERE THAT CAME FROM! 













HOLY FUCK HE’S BACK OMG
I’M ACUTALLY CRYING HERE OH GOD




can’t forget these

THESE ARE GOLDEN



Spiderman memes were one of my earliest experiences with the internet and with Tumblr and they will always be the greatest


I’ve seen these countless times and they still crack me up so much. I just hate when they appear on my dash at work. So hard not to laugh maniacally
andrysb24:

wheelchair-warrior:

bigmamag:

doctorwinchesterin221b:

locaoverloki:

prodigium-in-the-tardis:

amarilloo:

deeeeeeeeeeeeeeeaaaaaaaaaaaaaaan:

we-avenge-if-we-want-to:

triggafiasco:

loki-cat:

iamladyloki:

C R Y I N G OMG

I DONT THINK YOU GUYS UNDERSTAND
HOW MUCH I LOVE THESE SPIDERMAN PICS

OH OH OHHH! I have some!! 









oh shit not this fucking bullshit again oh my god jfklsdjflkj

THERE’S MORE WHERE THAT CAME FROM! 













HOLY FUCK HE’S BACK OMG
I’M ACUTALLY CRYING HERE OH GOD




can’t forget these

THESE ARE GOLDEN



Spiderman memes were one of my earliest experiences with the internet and with Tumblr and they will always be the greatest


I’ve seen these countless times and they still crack me up so much. I just hate when they appear on my dash at work. So hard not to laugh maniacally
andrysb24:

wheelchair-warrior:

bigmamag:

doctorwinchesterin221b:

locaoverloki:

prodigium-in-the-tardis:

amarilloo:

deeeeeeeeeeeeeeeaaaaaaaaaaaaaaan:

we-avenge-if-we-want-to:

triggafiasco:

loki-cat:

iamladyloki:

C R Y I N G OMG

I DONT THINK YOU GUYS UNDERSTAND
HOW MUCH I LOVE THESE SPIDERMAN PICS

OH OH OHHH! I have some!! 









oh shit not this fucking bullshit again oh my god jfklsdjflkj

THERE’S MORE WHERE THAT CAME FROM! 













HOLY FUCK HE’S BACK OMG
I’M ACUTALLY CRYING HERE OH GOD




can’t forget these

THESE ARE GOLDEN



Spiderman memes were one of my earliest experiences with the internet and with Tumblr and they will always be the greatest


I’ve seen these countless times and they still crack me up so much. I just hate when they appear on my dash at work. So hard not to laugh maniacally
andrysb24:

wheelchair-warrior:

bigmamag:

doctorwinchesterin221b:

locaoverloki:

prodigium-in-the-tardis:

amarilloo:

deeeeeeeeeeeeeeeaaaaaaaaaaaaaaan:

we-avenge-if-we-want-to:

triggafiasco:

loki-cat:

iamladyloki:

C R Y I N G OMG

I DONT THINK YOU GUYS UNDERSTAND
HOW MUCH I LOVE THESE SPIDERMAN PICS

OH OH OHHH! I have some!! 









oh shit not this fucking bullshit again oh my god jfklsdjflkj

THERE’S MORE WHERE THAT CAME FROM! 













HOLY FUCK HE’S BACK OMG
I’M ACUTALLY CRYING HERE OH GOD




can’t forget these

THESE ARE GOLDEN



Spiderman memes were one of my earliest experiences with the internet and with Tumblr and they will always be the greatest


I’ve seen these countless times and they still crack me up so much. I just hate when they appear on my dash at work. So hard not to laugh maniacally
andrysb24:

wheelchair-warrior:

bigmamag:

doctorwinchesterin221b:

locaoverloki:

prodigium-in-the-tardis:

amarilloo:

deeeeeeeeeeeeeeeaaaaaaaaaaaaaaan:

we-avenge-if-we-want-to:

triggafiasco:

loki-cat:

iamladyloki:

C R Y I N G OMG

I DONT THINK YOU GUYS UNDERSTAND
HOW MUCH I LOVE THESE SPIDERMAN PICS

OH OH OHHH! I have some!! 









oh shit not this fucking bullshit again oh my god jfklsdjflkj

THERE’S MORE WHERE THAT CAME FROM! 













HOLY FUCK HE’S BACK OMG
I’M ACUTALLY CRYING HERE OH GOD




can’t forget these

THESE ARE GOLDEN



Spiderman memes were one of my earliest experiences with the internet and with Tumblr and they will always be the greatest


I’ve seen these countless times and they still crack me up so much. I just hate when they appear on my dash at work. So hard not to laugh maniacally
andrysb24:

wheelchair-warrior:

bigmamag:

doctorwinchesterin221b:

locaoverloki:

prodigium-in-the-tardis:

amarilloo:

deeeeeeeeeeeeeeeaaaaaaaaaaaaaaan:

we-avenge-if-we-want-to:

triggafiasco:

loki-cat:

iamladyloki:

C R Y I N G OMG

I DONT THINK YOU GUYS UNDERSTAND
HOW MUCH I LOVE THESE SPIDERMAN PICS

OH OH OHHH! I have some!! 









oh shit not this fucking bullshit again oh my god jfklsdjflkj

THERE’S MORE WHERE THAT CAME FROM! 













HOLY FUCK HE’S BACK OMG
I’M ACUTALLY CRYING HERE OH GOD




can’t forget these

THESE ARE GOLDEN



Spiderman memes were one of my earliest experiences with the internet and with Tumblr and they will always be the greatest


I’ve seen these countless times and they still crack me up so much. I just hate when they appear on my dash at work. So hard not to laugh maniacally
andrysb24:

wheelchair-warrior:

bigmamag:

doctorwinchesterin221b:

locaoverloki:

prodigium-in-the-tardis:

amarilloo:

deeeeeeeeeeeeeeeaaaaaaaaaaaaaaan:

we-avenge-if-we-want-to:

triggafiasco:

loki-cat:

iamladyloki:

C R Y I N G OMG

I DONT THINK YOU GUYS UNDERSTAND
HOW MUCH I LOVE THESE SPIDERMAN PICS

OH OH OHHH! I have some!! 









oh shit not this fucking bullshit again oh my god jfklsdjflkj

THERE’S MORE WHERE THAT CAME FROM! 













HOLY FUCK HE’S BACK OMG
I’M ACUTALLY CRYING HERE OH GOD




can’t forget these

THESE ARE GOLDEN



Spiderman memes were one of my earliest experiences with the internet and with Tumblr and they will always be the greatest


I’ve seen these countless times and they still crack me up so much. I just hate when they appear on my dash at work. So hard not to laugh maniacally
andrysb24:

wheelchair-warrior:

bigmamag:

doctorwinchesterin221b:

locaoverloki:

prodigium-in-the-tardis:

amarilloo:

deeeeeeeeeeeeeeeaaaaaaaaaaaaaaan:

we-avenge-if-we-want-to:

triggafiasco:

loki-cat:

iamladyloki:

C R Y I N G OMG

I DONT THINK YOU GUYS UNDERSTAND
HOW MUCH I LOVE THESE SPIDERMAN PICS

OH OH OHHH! I have some!! 









oh shit not this fucking bullshit again oh my god jfklsdjflkj

THERE’S MORE WHERE THAT CAME FROM! 













HOLY FUCK HE’S BACK OMG
I’M ACUTALLY CRYING HERE OH GOD




can’t forget these

THESE ARE GOLDEN



Spiderman memes were one of my earliest experiences with the internet and with Tumblr and they will always be the greatest


I’ve seen these countless times and they still crack me up so much. I just hate when they appear on my dash at work. So hard not to laugh maniacally

andrysb24:

wheelchair-warrior:

bigmamag:

doctorwinchesterin221b:

locaoverloki:

prodigium-in-the-tardis:

amarilloo:

deeeeeeeeeeeeeeeaaaaaaaaaaaaaaan:

we-avenge-if-we-want-to:

triggafiasco:

loki-cat:

iamladyloki:

C R Y I N G OMG

I DONT THINK YOU GUYS UNDERSTAND

HOW MUCH I LOVE THESE SPIDERMAN PICS

OH OH OHHH! I have some!!
 image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

oh shit not this fucking bullshit again oh my god jfklsdjflkj

THERE’S MORE WHERE THAT CAME FROM! 

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

HOLY FUCK HE’S BACK OMG

I’M ACUTALLY CRYING HERE OH GOD

image

image

image

can’t forget these

THESE ARE GOLDEN

Spiderman memes were one of my earliest experiences with the internet and with Tumblr and they will always be the greatest

I’ve seen these countless times and they still crack me up so much. I just hate when they appear on my dash at work. So hard not to laugh maniacally

(Source: buffdaddylayton)


[on diversity in media] I think its social responsibility. I think it’s our responsibility to stand up and say what we want. It think if you look at television in the past two years, it’s becoming the decade of the female. Like, all these new shows with female leads. Even if you look at television, as well as cable, as well as films, there’s been a resurgence, as far as the leading woman in Hollywood, which is great. And I think we’re also at the point now…you know, it’s interesting…x

[on diversity in media] I think its social responsibility. I think it’s our responsibility to stand up and say what we want. It think if you look at television in the past two years, it’s becoming the decade of the female. Like, all these new shows with female leads. Even if you look at television, as well as cable, as well as films, there’s been a resurgence, as far as the leading woman in Hollywood, which is great. And I think we’re also at the point now…you know, it’s interesting…x

[on diversity in media] I think its social responsibility. I think it’s our responsibility to stand up and say what we want. It think if you look at television in the past two years, it’s becoming the decade of the female. Like, all these new shows with female leads. Even if you look at television, as well as cable, as well as films, there’s been a resurgence, as far as the leading woman in Hollywood, which is great. And I think we’re also at the point now…you know, it’s interesting…x

[on diversity in media] I think its social responsibility. I think it’s our responsibility to stand up and say what we want. It think if you look at television in the past two years, it’s becoming the decade of the female. Like, all these new shows with female leads. Even if you look at television, as well as cable, as well as films, there’s been a resurgence, as far as the leading woman in Hollywood, which is great. And I think we’re also at the point now…you know, it’s interesting…x

[on diversity in media] I think its social responsibility. I think it’s our responsibility to stand up and say what we want. It think if you look at television in the past two years, it’s becoming the decade of the female. Like, all these new shows with female leads. Even if you look at television, as well as cable, as well as films, there’s been a resurgence, as far as the leading woman in Hollywood, which is great. And I think we’re also at the point now…you know, it’s interesting…x

[on diversity in media] I think its social responsibility. I think it’s our responsibility to stand up and say what we want. It think if you look at television in the past two years, it’s becoming the decade of the female. Like, all these new shows with female leads. Even if you look at television, as well as cable, as well as films, there’s been a resurgence, as far as the leading woman in Hollywood, which is great. And I think we’re also at the point now…you know, it’s interesting…x

[on diversity in media] I think its social responsibility. I think it’s our responsibility to stand up and say what we want. It think if you look at television in the past two years, it’s becoming the decade of the female. Like, all these new shows with female leads. Even if you look at television, as well as cable, as well as films, there’s been a resurgence, as far as the leading woman in Hollywood, which is great. And I think we’re also at the point now…you know, it’s interesting…x

[on diversity in media] I think its social responsibility. I think it’s our responsibility to stand up and say what we want. It think if you look at television in the past two years, it’s becoming the decade of the female. Like, all these new shows with female leads. Even if you look at television, as well as cable, as well as films, there’s been a resurgence, as far as the leading woman in Hollywood, which is great. And I think we’re also at the point now…you know, it’s interesting…x

[on diversity in media] I think its social responsibility. I think it’s our responsibility to stand up and say what we want. It think if you look at television in the past two years, it’s becoming the decade of the female. Like, all these new shows with female leads. Even if you look at television, as well as cable, as well as films, there’s been a resurgence, as far as the leading woman in Hollywood, which is great. And I think we’re also at the point now…you know, it’s interesting…x

(Source: forassgard)

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